Friday, June 20, 2008

Parker Classic Ciselle Mechanical Pencil

Here’s a rather interesting oldie. Definitely a thing of beauty!Now, I’m far from being an expert on old pencils, but a bit of net surfing leads me to believe the following - it is a Parker 75, sterling silver body decorated in the ciselle pattern with gold trims (pocket-clip and push top button). The black lines are cut into the body to form the squares of the ciselle pattern. The pocket-clip is attached to the side of the body thus making it the “classic” style. (Editors Note, added 12 July 2008 - please read the comments to this posting to see I'm wrong. This is a Parker Classic, a different but similar looking model to the 75)
Apparently the 75 was produced from 1964 to 1994. By the 1970’s they appear to have used 0.9mm lead but mine uses a lead cartridge with 1.03mm lead. That’s a size I’m not familiar with. Being non-metric American, I guess it was called .040 or .041 lead at the time. So, I’m not sure if this means mine is one of the earlier 75’s or they offered two lead sizes, or…?

The lead cartridge is basically the same size as a ballpoint refill and contains the ratchet lead advance mechanism. The tip of the cartridge sticks out of the body so you can see the clutch jaws open and advance the lead, etc.
Photo - Tip of the cartridge (above), and below showing the tip sticking out of the end of the body when reassembled.
By today’s standards it’s a little strange to see this, and it’s not really all that aesthetically pleasing. Definitely the weak point in an otherwise very attractive writing instrument. Hmmm, time to get out the polishing cloth. Probably should have used before the photo shoot rather than afterwards.

25 comments:

Anonymous said...

Parker 75 pens are expensive, so I suppose it wasn't a cheap pencil?

I like the looks, but it doesn't give to me the thrill of a normal cheap pencil; it lacks austerity!

Best,

Johan

kiwi-d said...

Hello Johan
You are right, it wasn't cheap. But then perhaps it wasn't expensive either given that its made from solid silver. As you say, its a not a pencil for those who have austere tastes.

LePhare said...

Does it say where it was made k-d? It looks a little slimmer than the Sonnet Ciscelle, or perhaps it's the size of the lead. Cool pencil.

kiwi-d said...

Hi LePhare
The barrel is 8mm diameter, how dows that compare to the Sonnet? The centre ring is engraved thus "PARKER, Sterling Cap & Barrel, USA".

Adriano said...

It is a superb pencil; I am definitely a Parker fan. The 75 line is on my top ten list of classic suit-match pens.

LePhare said...

The Sonnet Ciselle is 9.5mm, and 10.5mm above the band. I wonder how many others are about.... not many my guess.

fishsaysmoo said...

ahhh I don't like Parker all that much- Too skinny : )

But this one definitely gets me with its strange lead size. Are you going to have a hard time finding more lead?

kiwi-d said...

Howdy Fish
I don't like my chances of getting spare leads at all. However, all is not lost. The jaws are more like leadholder jaws than "normal" modern mechanical pencil, so I think they are little forgiving on lead size. I haven't tried 1.18mm lead, but you can push a 0.9mm stick of lead up and the jaws do grip it. The only problem is the lead advance doesn't work too well with the 0.9mm - it sort of spits it out, so one push of the top button gets you 2 to 5mm of lead.

Anyway, I don't plan to use it for a lot of writing so not really an issue for me personalyy.

D Jacobson said...

I believe what you have is the "Classic" model, which looks just like the 75, but thinner. This model was also available as a ballpoint.

kiwi-d said...

Hi D Jacobsen
Thanks for your comment. So, just to clarify for a moron like me, you mean it's a Parker Classic, not a Parker 75 Classic? Strictly unrelated to a 75 but looks extremely similar?

wonderful said...

Parker 75 and Parker Classic are two distinct models. The cisele sterling silver pattern is used on several models but most famously on Parker 75 so it's quite common to mix them up! A parker 75 pencil would look like those ball pens here: http://www.penmuseum.co.uk/parker75.htm

For more details on Parker 75 a website is dedicated to it: http://www.parker75.com/

kiwi-d said...

Wonderful - thanks for this clarification. The most recent auction I participated in had this exact same pencil described as a Parker 75 Classic, hence my confusion.

Following the link you have provided, I then found this

http://parkerpens.net/parker/classic.shtml

Which is very informative and explains things. Maybe I need to rewrite and re-title this whole posting. I'll think about it.

tuntun said...

hi, i want to know if they still sell the Parker sonnet pencil in this type of Silver Cisele finish, I am particularly interested in the old style models with the thinner centre band

regards
kp

Anonymous said...

The early Classics were marketed as Parker 75 Classics - this was dropped sometime in the 1970's to Parker Classic. The early description has helped some sellers online to describe them as Parker 75 (sometimes dropping the "classic" bit entirely)to increase their value to unaware buyers. There is a canadian seller on ebay who sells ADVERTISEMENTS from the late 60's early 70's clearly showing the distinct Classic Pen with the headline Parker 75 Classic (the clip and slim form are quite distinct from the Parker 75). The beauty of these Cartridge pencils is they can be just as easily be used as a (god forbid) ballpoint - the body is identical to the ballpoints. Also the cartridge itself is very useful as a planner/diary pencil - 5.5mm diameter and 100mm length - very sturdy to boot. Only problem is lack of a clip, but it works perfectly and this way you can have a ballpoint and pencil for the price of one.

Anonymous said...

Further to the above, see item number 380186220855 on ebay.

Cute Ainee said...

Hello,
I wanted to know how to load lead in a Parker 75 (sterling silver) 0.7 mm pencil, after all the lead is gone. I bought a Parker 75 twist mechanism to drop the lead & now need to load new lead, Can any explain. Note; this is not the parker classic pencil & cartridge can not be taken out. Thanks in advance.

Anonymous said...

I have several vintage Parker twist pencils - they reload through the tip end - place the lead in the tip end and whilst keeping some tension on the lead with one hand slowly turn the CAP anticlockwise to take up the lead into the screw mechanism. Sometimes you get slippage where nothing seems to happen - a little bit of patience is required particularly as most of these mechanisms from the Parker 75 are more than 30 years old.

Anonymous said...

Where can I buy a lead cartridge?

Anonymous said...

The best way is to buy the older jotters prior to about 1980. These jotters came with brass threads in the cap and machined threads on the barrel and came with the lead cartridge usually 0.9mm but there are some with 0.7mm but very scarce. Quite often they can be bought in sets on ebay Mechanical pencil/ballpoint. To buy the lead cartridge individually they tend to fetch crazy prices on ebay - up to USD30.

Anonymous said...

I HAVE A PARKER 75 CISELLE PENCIL AND WANT TO KNOW WHERE I CAN GET ERASER REFILLS FOR IT?

b said...

Hi m8!

I own another version of this pen, whitch ins't writing with ink or so, but with a little graphite. It is also from the parker "75" silver line.
Can you Email me what it would be worth now?

Thanks

BBB (Holland)

Kiwi-d said...

Sorry BBB, I've no idea of its value. I'd suggest you check eBay listings to get some idea.

Anonymous said...

Hi Dave, and all. I just found one of these myself with spotted tarnish. Would you recommend keeping it and tearing off the ugly gold arrow or offering it up to a gold arrow-loving home. I see the clash of utilitarian and austere looks, but since mine has a bit of tarnish, and I'm a lead holder guy, I'm drawn to pushing it in the post apocalyptic direction and losing the gold accents. I like the industrial feel of the grid.

I got it because it caught my eye and I thought there might be demand, but if it's a low point, I'll keep it.

Thanks,
Leadholder

Kiwi-d said...

Well if your first name is Dennis then I'd rip that golden arrow off, clean up the tarnish and revel in your improvement on those mis-guided idiots at Parker. I hadn't really thought of it before, but the ciselle pattern would be great for a serious industrial designers leadholder.

On the other hand if your name isn't Dennis then I'd test the market opportunities and maybe use the money to buy something classy with C'dA or something stamped on it.

Anonymous said...

Thanks so much for all the information found on this site - it's helped me identify a recently acquired very gently used pen & pencil set (with original box. After reading and searching for about 2 hours and then finally finding this blog have come up with that it's the sterling silver classic MP set - the pen is ballpoint and the pencil is cap activated and has a cartridge refill.

Next is to ascertain a fair selling price. My husband almost put a $3 tag on it for an upcoming yard sale when I saved it!