Tuesday, October 03, 2006

Lamy 2000 Mechanical Pencil Review

Lamy 2000 Mechanical Pencil Review

Well it’s been a long time coming, but finally I am getting around to reviewing a pencil that I use on a daily basis, the Lamy 2000. It’s a long smooth torpedo of a pencil – no grips, side buttons, logos, fancy colour schemes or patterns; just minimalist simplicity.

The body of the Lamy 2000 is made from fibreglass-reinforced Makrolon, that’s Bayer’s brand of polycarbonate, so it’s the good stuff from the world of engineering plastics. Excellent toughness and stability, they make ‘bullet-proof glass’ from polycarbonate. The 2000 has a ‘brushed’ finish which gives it a very nice feel in the hand. Smooth yet not, it’s a very tactile experience - almost a ‘wood’ sort of feel. A fellow employee came into my office the other day and in the middle of a rather animated discussion wanted to draw me a diagram, so he grabbed the pencil off my desk, and just came to a halt. “Wow, this is a nice pencil” as he ran it through his fingers. I made a deliberate point of getting it back from him after he had finished the diagram. “Mine” I said, “This one doesn’t go walk-about”. The brushed finish also means the grip is pretty good on this pencil. Over time it also starts to get a little bit of a polish or patina on the area you grip it by. I’ll leave you to decide if that’s a good thing or not. Personally I’m not all that keen on it, but some folk definitely are. The tapering body also helps with the grip as you can effectively choose to grip it where it feels best. Being mostly plastic it’s not a particularly heavy pencil, but it’s still got a reasonable weight to it.

The brushed finish is carried on through to the metal parts as well. The tip and pocket clip are brushed stainless steel. The pocket clip is excellent. Its spring loaded and works really well. “Lamy” is stamped in small plain insignificant letters into the side of the clip. There are no other markings on the pencil, apart from a ‘5’ on the top button to indicate the lead diameter. As usual, Lamy don’t go out of their way to push any sort of brand recognition. In fact, I’ve seen a Lamy 2000 ballpoint which is about 30 years old and it doesn’t even have the ‘Lamy’ on the side of the pocket clip.

The mechanism is a push top ratchet. Mine is 0.5mm lead, but 0.7mm is also available. There is a small eraser under the top button; occasional use only! You remove the eraser to refill the lead magazine. There is also a needle to help clear any lead jams, but I’ve never had any problems like that. The tip is not retractable. It’s a small short cone for writing only, but it’s a little sharp to be classed as totally pocket safe.

Lamy say, “The Lamy 2000 has been writing its way into design history since 1966. Even today, many people regard it as one of the world’s most modern writing instruments.” Well, for what it’s worth, I agree. Lamy designer Gerd A. Muller did a great job with this one.

  • Best Points – Classic simplicity.
  • Not So Good Points – Not fully pocket safe.
  • Price Range – High.

Dimensions – Length 138mm, diameter 11mm at widest point. Balance point about 65mm up from the tip.

79 comments:

Anonymous said...

And what a fine pencil it is! It's by far my number 1 favourite (with the Scribble in 2nd place. I have looked at the Caran d'Ache Ecridor, Pelikan Epoch and even owned a Lamy Accent. But I always end up liking my 2000 better. So I gave my accent away and always keep my two favourites close. I do own a Faber Castell mini as well - but that's more a collectors item than everyday pencil. Well....my point was that the 2000 is one of the very best pencils available.

Anonymous said...

Do you find with the patina that develops the grip begins to slip?

Also, do you prefer .005 to .007?

I prefer the thicker lead.

Thx.

kiwi-d said...

Hi, the patina is only very light, and I don't think it would ever get to the slippery stage.

In general I'm probably a 0.5mm lead person, but definitely thincker isbetter for some purposes. I'll soon be posting a follow up on the 2000 which will note how i should be using something thicker than 0.5mm in my 2000.

Speedmaster said...

Very nice review. I have the Lamy 2000 fountain pen and love it.

purpleplume said...

We need to talk. Virtually, of course. I don't have this Lamy 2000, but my favorite pencil is something that resembles it. It's made by Stabilo and it's a 0.5.

Now I'm very particular about my pencils. Maybe it's because I'm a writer. Or because I started off as an accountant. Pencils continue to be important to me, and I'm very specific about what I like and don't like in a pencil.

Like the Lamy 2000, my Stabilo has a torpedo-shaped body and no irritating ridges or grips. Unlike the Lamy 2000, the body is made of black rubber. Come to think of it, it's the same material that my PEBL cell phone is made of.

But mine seems more stylishly designed than the Lamy 2000. The silver tip and trim are brushed silver, not shiny. I think shiny is an engineer thing. I prefer brushed. And the clip has this ubercool round ball at the bottom of it. So even the clip is stylish.

Trouble is, the art supply store where I always bought these no longer carries it. I am desperate for more of these pencils. I went online to search for a supplier and that's how I found your blog. No supplier yet though.

If you could help a damsel in distress locate this pencil I would be forever in your debt. I will buy hundreds. Well, at least dozens.

And while your being so gallant, send over a NZ Pinot.

Cheers!

kiwi-d said...

Hi purpleplume
Well sorry, I don't think I can help. I'm not all that familiar with Stabilo, but I've never seen anything of theirs like the Lamy 2000. I've checked their corporate and Singapore websites and theirs nothing like that - at least that I saw in a quick search.

So, at this stage I can't justify sending you a bottle of wine, packed with hundreds of pencils.

kiwi-d said...

I fogot to add that the metal items on the Lamy 2000 are a brushed finish, but still relatively shiny.

Anonymous said...

Ordered this mechanical pencil based on your review and of course, it's great design. The Lamy 2000 lead advancing and holding system has a good solid feel and holds the lead securely. I like the simplicity of the pencil body; smooth with no annoying ornamentation. (I was originally going for the Caran D'Ache Dunas but didn't like the mid-body lead ID collar. Seems odd to have it on a writing pencil and detracts from the nice lines of the pencil.) Only complaint with the Lamy 2000 is the meager eraser; when will (quality) pencil manufacturers realize that consumers would appreciate a real working eraser? I wasn't sure I should spend this much money on a pencil but it was money well spent and I enjoy using it every day. TK

kiwi-d said...

Hi TK - well I'm glad you like your Lamy 2000. You are right, there are very few luxury pencils that have a substantial eraser. I guess its a problem of styling. The luxury writing instruements only sell small quantities, the same basic body design usually does many options - FP, BP, RB and MP, and so there just isn't room to get a big eraser apparatus in there. Still, we can always hope.
:-)

Anonymous said...

After using this pencil almost daily since mid-February, I can still say that it was money well spent. I especially like the brushed finish and taper of the pencil body. Very comfortable. If there's one thing Lamy could improve, it would be to refine the lead advance so that it only advances 1mm instead of 1.5mm. I find that even with 0.7mm lead, I'll break it occassionally if I don't wait until the lead wears up to the metal tip before advancing. If you advance the lead too soon there's just too much lead exposed and it's susceptible to breakage. Still, a great pencil. TK

Max said...

Right, here follows my list of favourite MPs in order of preference:

1. Lamy 2000 0.7: Because it's a treat to hold and I can write with it for hours without any signs of fatique (except for a sore bottom...). And it holds more leads than any other MP.

2. Caran D'Ache 844 Metal Pencil: It's wonderful in it's simple and understated way of just getting through a full day of work. It's not quite as pleasant to hold as the Lamy 2000 though, and the advancing mechanism isn't quite as good as Pentel Ains and Faber-Castell leads sometimes slip a little.

3. Lamy Scribble 0.7: Because it's so perfect at what it was intended for: jotting down quick notes. It's of excellent build quality.

4. Caran D'Ache Ecridor: Because it's built like a tank but with grace. It's also fairly pleasant to write with. I wish the push botton would be a little longer as in the 844 though. I feel I have to look after it so it won't fall off, and I'll lose it. Expensive though.

5. Pentel Graphgear 1000 0.7: This is the MP that should have made no. 1. It's solidly built, it's got a retractable tip, the rubber grib actually works in a pleasant way. But it's a technical pencil and not intended for writing. Which means the the tip of the lead is further away from my finger tips than I prefer. It rests in my everyday bag.

6. Lamy Accent (black with black rubber grip: It's in really nice quality. It's quite heavy though and really thick to hold. Too thick for me. Still a nice pencil though.

I thought about what else to buy and looked at the Pelikan Epoch. But I've read somewhere that it's built from aluminiu, and really light. It looks solid and therefore shouldn't be light. Most MPs are 0.5, and I prefer 0.7. I also prefer a push mechanism which further limits my options. So perhaps I should try to be happy with what I've already got :)

Anonymous said...

Max - great list. There must be some mental telepathy going on here beacuse last night before I saw this posting I wrote on paper a fairly long scribe about what pencil design I like (intending to use for a comment here) and of course naming the ones I liked and disliked. Anyway it didn't get beyond that paper stage and yours is a far more impressive list. Well done.

2 1/2P

Max said...

Hehe..thanks a lot. I hope you will complete and post your list here sometime! In fact, I would love if more would post favourite designs and/or pencils. Thanks :)

Anonymous said...

Hey Dave, great blog. I read it all the time. The other day while pondering deep thoughts and gazing at my Lamy 2000 0.5 that I bought on your recommendation (thanks, excellent pencil), I noticed some lettering stamped on the underside of the pocket clip in black block letters. "GERMANY 1."

kiwi-d said...

Hi Anonymous. Thanks for the compliment. Yes, mine has that too, although I didn't bother mentioning it at the time. If I remember, I must check, but my father has an old Lamy 2000 BP from the 1970's or so, and I don't think it has GERMANY underneath.

Anonymous said...

The engravings are likely related to the most recent German reunification.

I have a Mont Blanc Meisterstück FP that I bought new in the 70's, and engraved on the ring that is part of the pocket clip is W GERMANY.

The newer ones are engraved GERMANY.

Anonymous said...

nice job on the review i have been contemplating about getting the 2000....i have one question though for those of you who own the 2000 is the 2000 very durable and scratch resisant because i hate it when i scratch my pens

Max said...

The surface on the 2000 is very durable. The texture is sort of engraved with fine lines, so you won't see any scratches. The material is called Makrolon which is just Bayer's name for polycarbonate. The only thing you might not like is that the pocket clip is of metal but held in place by surrounding makrolon. So the clip might wobble a little sideways. However, I've had my 2000 for...6 years I think, and it's exactly the same as when I got it.

kiwi-d said...

I'd agree with Max. The surface is quite hard wearing, and doesn't tend to show scratches because it is already pre-roughened. But then if you carry it in a pocket rubbing around against with coins, keys, etc then like any pencil its going to show some wear.

Anonymous said...

what would be more worth my money, the lamy accent pencil or 2000 pencil

wes said...

im announcing my part im now a follower of dave

wes said...

can i wrote a review of the lamy tripen on here

kiwi-d said...

Hi Wes. I am always happy to consider a guest article or review. Please contact me at the email address up in the blog header to discuss.

wes said...

kiwi i know that with all your expirience in the pencil industry that you will suggest me a great pencil

i like very durable pencils that are scratch resistant

i prefer functuality over sheer looks

i am willing to spend 50-80 us dollars

what pencil is right for me

Max said...

To anonymous: Accent vs. 2000
I have both. The Accent is über-durable! However, the surface isn't 'pre-scratched' as the 2000 so my Accent is showing some wear and tear.
Also, it's quite heavy and I find the shape a little odd because the where I hold it is thicker than the rest. The 2000 on the other hand has the perfect shape in my world.
But then again, to me the 2000 is the greatest mech. pencil in the world, so I'm really biased...

Anonymous said...

To max do you know what metal the lamy accent is made out of

Anonymous said...

Makrolon is what legos are
Made out of

wes said...

does anyone here own the lamy dialog 1

Anonymous said...

Hi dave is the lamy2000 the best pencil in the world.

kiwi-d said...

Wes - Yes, I have a Dialog 1. I have been meaning to review it for several years now!

Anonymous - Lamy 2000 the best pencil in the world. Its a great pencil, but not perfect, so probably not the best in the world. Don't ask me what the best is though, I'm still looking.

Anonymous said...

For everyone wanting a Montblanc (Masterpiece) pencil,
ebay Germany is the place to go, they are less expensive here.
http://www.ebay.de/

Enter this as the search string:
montblanc (bleist*, dreh*, drück*, mine*) -roll* -kugel* -kuli*

good luck, Arne

Anonymous said...

Hi Dave!

Are you still using your Lamy 2000 0.5 mm pencil? Or did you buy a 0.7 mm Lamy 2000?

I am just about to order a Lamy 2000 pencil, but can't decide on which lead size :P

kiwi-d said...

Still on 0.5mm, but if i was buying again, for my personal circumstances, I would get 0.7mm for that extra bit of strength.

Anonymous said...

Hi again!

I think I'll go for the 0.5 mm, since I will only be using it while taking notes at university.

I read your blog a lot and it's really nice, bought a Lamy Scribble 0.7 mm cause of your blog :D

The Scribble made me unsure if I want to use a Lamy 2000 0.5 mm or 0.7 mm. But since I have always used 0.5 before my Scribble, I'll go with 0.5 mm :)

Anonymous said...

hi dave its wes. what is the mechanism the dialog 1. ex. do you twits the pen to get the tip out or do you click the top

kiwi-d said...

Wes - you click the top. I hope to have a Dialog 1 review posted in a couple of months.

Anonymous said...

Hi, I purchased a Lamy 2000 0.7mm pencil and like it a lot. The only fly in the ointment is the clip - there seems to be quite a bit of lateral movement, which in time would probably mark the barrel. Is this a feature of this pencil or do I just have one that slipped through QC??
I do have the option of sending it back to the seller.

kiwi-d said...

Lateral wobble of the clip is normal, see also Max's comment above. Mine does have some marking on the body from this movement, but its not really all that noticeable.

Louis said...

Hi Dave!

I finally ordered a Lamy 2000 0.5 mm :P
Should be getting it this week :D

wes said...

Dave, I literally just came back form the stationary store and bought the 2000. The feel of it in my small hands is incredible. It is smooth yet grippy with its pre-scratched surface. It is sleek and has a sort of warm feeling to it like it belongs in my hand. The lead mechanism is quite ab-normal, but i like it. The lamy 2000 has sky-rocketed into being my #1! pencil in a matter of like 4 minutes.


My top three favourite MP's are
drumroll please..........

1. Lamy 2000. it is light weight durable, sleek, and has the greatest feeling in the world.

2. Lamy tripen 656. a cool titanium black pencil with a highlighter, a black ballpoint, and a very nice pencil.

3. Pentel p205. the classic drafting pencil with a great feel and excelant mechanism.

kiwi-d said...

Glad to hear you are happy with your purchase.

Time Waster said...

I just got a Lamy 2000 today it's ok...I was hoping it would be smooth for writing or drawing But I find the Pentel Kerry superior for that I haven't found anything to match the Kerry.
I own (14) Kerry's =)

kiwi-d said...

14 Kerry's !!!
That's over the top even by my standards.

Javier said...

Yeah.. Over the top definitely :)

I'm almost there myself. 10 Kerry's in the collection. Another that is beat-up that I use as a daily writer and the wife and daughter each have a pink one.

wes said...

does office depot sell the kerry's

Paul G said...

Thanks a million for your reviews Dave, you are the best source on the internet for what you cover. Hats off to you!

So, after reading your review and other's comments about the Lamy 2000, I decided to get one. I was afraid that it might be one of those things that gets too much hype, but that isn't the case at all. The Lamy 2000 is fantastic.

I recently got a Pentel Kerry too, but have found that I prefer the Lamy 2000 for the way it feels in my hand. For one thing the 2000 is 5 mm longer than the Kerry. That and the absence of any middle section on it seems to make for a lot more comfortable hold. Also, I seem to find that the clip is slightly more out of the way, where on the Kerry these parts seem to get more in the way of a nice comfortable grip. The material that the 2000 is made out of also seems a little more grippable than the Kerry, and I prefer the thickness of the body of the 2000.

Thanks again for pointing me in the right direction, and all your efforts to provide such an excellent resource.

Paul G

Paul G said...

Time Waster,
If you don't find the 2000 "smooth" maybe all you need to do is replace the lead in it. That was the first thing I did, and filled it with Pentel Super Hi Polmer.
Paul

Kenny D. said...

Hi. I bought a Lamy Scribble a few months back based on your review. On days I carry a pencil in my pocket, it's the one I use. However, I find myself wanting a full-size pencil at work & at home.

It seems from the pictures that a Lamy 2000 pencil would be very similar to having a Scribble stretched out. Can you write a comparison of the two? The other main contender is a Pentel Kerry II as I do want something pocket safe.

Max said...

I wouldn't call the Lamy 2000 pocket safe. If you want something pocket safe the Pentel Kerry would be a much better choice for you. Also the Pentel Graphgear 1000. I don't know if your reason for wanting a bigger pen is because you get writing fatigue from the Scribble. If so, the Lamy 2000 would be great. If I need to write a lot that's the pencil I reach for! Period. But it's not pocket safe.... Good luck in finding the right one!
PS. Please let us know what you chose :)

Kenny D. said...

Max,
I actually ended up ordering a Pilot Opt in their StarDust Blue design from Jetpens.com. It looks really nice, can clip onto thicker objects, is almost as pocket safe as the Kerry and best of all only costs $3! Added bonus: it is a shaker pencil. You can either advance the lead the normal click-button way or shake to advance the lead.

I'll write a review on my blog when I get the pencil:

Here's the link for it the pencil:
http://www.jetpens.com/product_info.php/cPath/45_547/products_id/3901

Max said...

Congratulations! That's a really nice pen! Never seen it here (in Denmark). I did have a Pilot shaking pencil when I was in school. But that was a bit like the Pilot Shaker Pencil H-1010. Quite a heavy pencil for a little lad ;) I really like the big, sold clip on your new pencil.
Once again, congratulations!!

kiwi-d said...

Kenny D - I will do a little something re comparing Scribble to 2000, but it will take a while.

Anonymous said...

Dave, thanks for the great reviews. It's nice to know I'm not the only pencil geek. I'm very interested in your comparison of the Scribble to the 2000 because I have the 2000 (in 0.5 width) and am thinking of getting the Scribble. There are two things about the 2000 that don't exactly suit me. The main thing is that I tend to break the lead a lot; I think that's because I need to advance twice, and then too much is sticking out. That may depend on the brand of lead. It may also be different for 0.7 vs 0.5. The other thing I've noticed is that the 2000 seems a little skinny for me and my fingers slip down just a little. I wonder if the Scribble may actually be too fat. Then again, a Parker 51 or Pelikan M200 fountain pen feels about the right girth to me -- if you have any experience with those. I know, they ain't pencils! ;-) --Another Dave into Writing Instruments

Kenny D. said...

I've got the pencil in the mail yesterday. As usual, JetPens shipping is super fast!

Anyway, this pencil is great. I'm wishing I ordered two of them :-)

It writes very well (as to be expected with Pilot's pencils), it looks really nice, even though it is a darker blue than I was expecting from the pictures, the clip works great, the eraser works really well for a mechanical pencil eraser (it is a tad small though), and the shaker thing is pretty neat to mess with.

Only things I'm not sure about - I don't know if the shaker will cause problems if I keep the pencil in my pocket. Probably only if I jog with it in my pocket? Also it is only a $3 pencil. I'm curious to see how durable it is over time.

Stephen said...

Anonymous of October 8th - I actually believe Lamy's internal mechanism results in more lead breakage than other brands. Or at least in my hand. (Based on a Safari, 2000, and Scribble.)

Anonymous said...

Hey Stephen-- interesting comment about Lamy's internal mechanism and lead breakage. I wonder: does the sliding sleeve on the Lamy Scribble reduce the breakage? The reviews I've seen don't comment on whether the sliding sleeve works well. Does it? Some sliding sleeves frustrate me because they really don't slide, and I just have to advance the lead farther.

Thanks, "Anonymous of October 8th" a.k.a. Seattle Dave

kiwi-d said...

The Scribble sleeve does slide, but its only a short little thing. Scribble is 0.7mm whereas 2000 is 0.5 or 0.7. I will soon publish a Scribble and 2000 comparison which will mention this lead breakage. I personally don't have a breakage problem with 0.7 Scribble, but 0.5 2000 defintely has more breakages.

Anonymous said...

I have a customer that is looking purchase 50 to 70 good quality mechanical pencil that I can etch. He is wanting a wood barrell, good craftmanship, and a very durable pencil. He is wanting these pencils engraved which I have a laser and can do the engraving.

Any help or advice would be greatly appreciated.
Craig Watson
Craig@PromoteYourBusiness.net

Louis said...

Hi Dave and everybody!

I am also having breakage problems with the 0.5 mm version of Lamy 2000. Some days I can write a lot without any problem, and some days I'd break the lead a lot :P

Think I might just buy the 0.7 mm version as well, so I can use it on my "bad days" :P

Tony said...

Hi Dave,

So I got the Lamy 2000 per your recommendation and I love it! One problem is that I just lost the end cap to it, and fortunately Lamy sells replacement caps, but they're $10 each! Do you or anyone else know of a cheaper solution?

Kiwi-d said...

Hi Tony - well glad you like your 2000, but sorry I can't help re the cap.

Anonymous said...

Hi Dave,

I got a Lamy 2000 about a year ago based on your review, and for the most part been very happy with it. It's developed a problem with the lead advance, and I wondered if this is something you've seen: there seems to be no friction at all in the mechanism when the lead advance is pressed- held vertically, the entire lead drops out of the pencil!
The pencil has gotten some rough handling from my kids, so it might have gotten some damage.
I do like it well enough that I've already bought a replacement.

Kiwi-d said...

I have experienced and reported this exact problem elaswhere on this blog.

http://davesmechanicalpencils.blogspot.com/2006/10/plus-or-minus-how-much.html

Also had it with the 2000 as well as Waterman.

So, what brand of lead are you using?

Just this week I have also experienced the reverse - lead so thick it will only just squeeze through.

Frederik said...

Hi Dave,

what a find to discover your site. You seem to be one of the only peoplen on the internet truly dedicated in the subject of mechanical pencils. This is why I know come to you for help.
Firstly please excuse any weird language - I am to you writing from Denmark.

I am writing to you because I have searched the internet and every bookshop I have passed the last two years for that one pencil that got away. I dropped in the ocean on a fishing-trip... Sad story.
The main problem in finding its replacement is the fact that I can't remember the brand.

So as a far fetched cry for help I hope you would recognize it from a description.

It was metal,
with a black rubber 'fingerholding',
retractable conical point,
came in .5 and .7 (I prefer the thicker one),
the lead would flex inwards when pushed hard on the paper,
black eraser (small quickly used-up),
very sturdy structure,
sort of angular shaft (much like parts of Faber-Castells Executive edition),
sort of dusted polish.

Well, I know this is a long-shot, but what the hay. I just hop you might recognize it.

Anonymous said...

Thanks for the feedback!

I'm using Pentel Super Hi-Polymer and Pental AIN. I just experimented a little with the problem pencil. Both types of lead, along with the lead from Lamy in the new pencil, drop right through, whereas they all seem to offer about the same (reasonable) level of drag in the new pencil with the lead advance pressed.

So the issue seems to be with the pencil.

Kiwi-d said...

Anonymous - well the diameter of Pentel shouldn't be a problem. So, as you say its probably the pencil. I wonder if the rubber o-ring in the tip has either broken/worn or more likely been lost...small investigating hands dissambling, unscrewing the metal tip section and screwing back together...but the o-ring can easily fall out and the result is then as you describe...complete fall out.

Kiwi-d said...

Hi Frederik. ANother Dane! You know I'm tempted to think that per capita, Danes might just be the biggest readers of this blog...well outside of the Anglosphere at least.
I'm sorry, nothing springs to mind. Without a brand its difficult. Perhaps one of your Danish brands...Reflex, Penol?

2nd_astronaut said...

My guess for Frederik would be a Ballograf like this one
http://www.ballograf.com/Page.asp?PageId=52

Kiwi-d said...

2nd, as always, you are an asset to the space programme. Number 1 must be nervous about being knocked off his perch.

Anonymous said...

Hello, just got the Lamy 2000 today and I have one question for you owners: do you feel like there is a slight ridge where the pencil unscrews? As if the two halves are not perfectly aligned, you could feel it when you slide your fingers. Definately not as smooth as the metal tip connects to the black plastic part. Is it just me or is this just part of the design process? Please, any comments would help. Thank you.

Kiwi-d said...

Anonymous - another reader asked a similar question just a few weeks ago. 2 similar questions in the same month - seems it might be more than a coincidence. Here's the other question and replies down in the Jan 2011 comments.
http://davesmechanicalpencils.blogspot.com/2007/08/poll-1-lamy-2000.html

Max said...

Hi Frederik. Good to see you on here. I'm also Danish but has recently moved from Copenhagen to London. The pencil you lost could sound a bit like the Staedtler 760 that they stock at every post office (Post Danmark). It has the triangular shape and rubber grip. And it has a quite sturdy dusty shiny structure.

Hope you'll find another!!
Good luck!

Eager said...

I am considering purchasing the lamy 2000 0.7mm. Can somebody advise what kind of coloured leads would be suitable for this pencil. Also, what leads give the best dark black colour.

Anonymous said...

Dave,

Thank you for your write-up of the Lamy 2000 which I took ownership of today. I would include a photograph of the opening of the product and its presentation, but that is not possible here. I chose the 0.70 mm point as I will use this most in my aerospace quality engineering job.

The pencil is light and comfortable in my hand. Although the point does not retract into the body, it will not pose problems if I put it my shirt pocket. The pencil looks hand crafted and writes beautifully.

My only gripe, if I have one, is that the eraser is too small and one must remove the cap to use it. This will certainly prevent me from making mistakes in the future.

Thanks again :)

Anonymous said...

Well, after using the Lamy 2000 for over five years I replaced it with a Pentel Sharp Kerry (P1035) as my everyday pencil. It's a 0.7 in blue. The Kerry is now my favorite mechanical pencil, no contest. Why would I abandon the Lamy 2000, which is such a fine pencil? Because I got tired of the mediocre lead advance mechanism. As mentioned by me and several others, it advances the lead too far with each click, resulting in broken leads. It's so bad that the last 12-15mm of lead is basically wasted. So long Lamy 2000, you're now just another backup pencil in the coffee mug. TK

Kiwi-d said...

Yes, the length of lead advance is definitely the weak point of the Lamy 2000

Clive said...

Re the earlier posting by Purpleplume regarding a Stabilo with similar shape to the Lamy 2000. There is the Stabilo Noble in Blue or Black (0.5mm)targeted as a promotional item in their catalogue (http://www.stabilo-promotion.com. This does not appear to be available in common retail outlets, so presumably only available to purchase in bulk. There appears to be a similar pencil labelled as the Stabilo style 3235 (made in China?) available on the Pencils.jp site.

Anonymous said...

I found that my newly bought Lamy 2000 pencil does produce minor noise resulted from the rattle of the steel lead feeder. May I know does anyone else encounter this? Thanks

Max said...

Hi,

I just yested my 2000 0.7 which is about 10 years old. No rattle when feeding or writing. Don't know if yours is faulty.
I've written Lany customer support before and they seemed really good at getting back.

Good luck with it!